Digital Painting Vs Traditional Painting

There is a lot going on when it comes to compare our traditions and origins to something relatively new such as the digital world. I don't disagree with some of the sensorial-related topics ( I DO love the smell of the brand new canvas, or feeling the soft brushes on my skin, but I also enjoy the freedom of having unlimited tools that instead of taking a whole room fit in a very small "box").

We could sit here and list aaaall the pros and cons of both traditional and digital, but I think that at the end is is still just a matter of personal preference.

Personally I don't think too much about the differences because they are quite evident, but I like to focus more on the similarities, but If I have to question myself about my preferences I like to put it this way:
-If there was a libra for calculating the "weight" of sensorial feelings (Traditional) and another one set on the same unit to calculate the "weight" of the creative potential (Digital), which result would I get if I compare them?-

In my opinion "time" plays a very interesting and important role in both areas:
If you spend two months on an oil painting (drying waiting times, longer-forced observation, careful with the budget which means more time for choosing the right colors..etc), at the end of your journey the satisfaction will be incredible, as the desire to see your artwork complete have built up during the whole process..
In digital art time plays a different music:
We are used to do more courageous choices because we have an undo button as a quick fix when things go wrong.
If with digital tools we can check at least 20 different versions of our artwork in the time needed for creating a single rough version in traditional art, the quality of the satisfaction could be less of an impact when the work is finished, but it might be more powerful for the spectators as we had time to explore many different outcomes and choose the most powerful out of them.

A cool experiment would be inverting the two approaches:
With traditional, use all tools you have like you have an "undo" button, so without thinking too much about ruining the painting and following the flow.

With digital try using just one layer, no blending modes or filters and paint like it is a real canvas (so no eydropper either!!)
I got an interesting result when I did this experiment:


Painting on a canvas without thinking brought me this:


Approaching photoshop like it was a real canvas:
(Left Original painting - Right digital reproduction)









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A journey through my studies in Amsterdam. 3D modelling with Maya and 3dsMax, Photoshop and digital painting.